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This loop covers the northern portion of the Eastern Shore from Fairhope to Daphne, then crosses Mobile Bay on the Causeway (US 90/98) and continues northward up US 90A to Blakeley Island. The final site is on US 43 and offers a picnic area and boardwalks overlooking Chickasaw Creek. The balance of this loop will generally involve birds at a distance and a spotting scope is very helpful, if not necessary. There are many accommodations for food and lodging in the area, particularly around the intersection of US 98 and I-10 at exit 35.

5 Rivers Delta Resource Center

5 Rivers sits on the banks of one of the canals that traverse the Mobile-Tensaw delta. The decks of the Delta Hall and the perimeter trail around the facility provide excellent vantage points to observe birds of the surrounding marsh and waterways. In spring and summer look for Brown Pelican, Osprey, King Rail, Marsh Wren and several species of herons and egrets. Occasionally, Least Bittern and Purple Gallinule may be encountered along the margins of the emergent marsh. Painted Bunting may also be possible in the thickets near the buildings. Check here for migrants in spring and fall.

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Battleship Park

Battleship Park presents the birder with a diversity of habitat to explore and a great variety of birds to observe. Pinto Pass and the mudflats of Mobile Bay filled with waterfowl in winter and shorebirds during migration, short grass lawns for dowitchers and Black-bellied Plover, salt water marsh with herons and egrets. During low tide this area is filled with herons, egrets and occasionally ibis, especially in late summer. Black-necked Stilt may be around any time of the year and in summer, Gull-billed Tern is present.

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Blakeley Island – Mud Lakes

Depending on water levels and time of year, the first pond on the right (south) often offers the best conditions for viewing waterfowl like Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Mottled Duck, and Northern Shoveler, and various shorebirds, gulls and terns. This is also one of the best places to find White-rumped and Baird’s Sandpipers in late spring.

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Blakeley Island – North Blakeley Disposal Area

The Mud Lakes on Blakeley Island are well known to Alabama birders as one of the best spots in South Alabama for shorebirds and waterfowl. The Island, at the western end of the Mobile Causeway, along the east side of US 90A, can be reached from either US 90 or I-10.

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Blakeley Island – South Blakeley Disposal Area

At the top of the dike, scan the large ponds in various stages of management; you must stay on the perimeter dikes. Best areas usually are in the northwest and southwest corners of the pond. This is a regular site for Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, where they now breed.

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D’Olive Bay Overlook

D’Olive Overlook provides an excellent view of the bay. In winter, check the bay for ducks and pelicans as well as wading birds year around. In addition, Peregrine Falcons are occasionally seen perching on top of the causeway light poles along I-10.

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Fairhope Municipal Pier and Beach

Fairhope Municipal Pier and Beach are good places to check for all manner of water-loving birds-gulls, terns, shorebirds and wintering waterfowl.

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Meaher State Park

Meaher State Park’s 1.327 acres are situated in the wetlands of Mobile Bay. There are two boardwalks that offer the visiting birder an extensive view of the Bay. Winter time brings in American White Pelicans and waterfowl, while in other seasons, a wide variety of wading birds, gulls and terns may be observed.

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Mobile Bay Mudflats

The best viewing at the Mobile Bay Mudflats is during low tide when the mudflats are exposed. This is a good place to look for herons, egrets and Boat-tailed Grackles any time of year. An assortment of sandpipers and plovers are regular during spring and fall migration. During high tide in winter, American Coot and waterfowl are regular.

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Village Point Park

Village Point Park (70 acres) is the largest park in the city of Daphne and provides the birder with a mixture of habitats-marsh, salt water bay, woodlands and several ways to observe them- a 3,000- foot main trail that takes visitors westward toward Mobile Bay and an extensive boardwalk and pier. Waders, ducks, and woodland species may be observed and Bald Eagle is not uncommon.

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William Brooks Park

The trails at William Brooks Park pass through a variety of habitats ranging from mixed pine-hardwood uplands to forested bottomlands. Look for migrants during the spring and fall. Prothonotary Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Summer Tanager, and Red- winged Blackbird are regular summer residents.

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